Dating people of different religions

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However, my boyfriend is currently finding his faith which I have been nothing but supportive about – but he feels it is imperative to be on the exact same page spiritually and have the same religious beliefs.

I personally believe our core values are the same and we both are great people – I don’t believe going to church every Sunday makes one individual any better than the next.

For Solomon followed Astarte the goddess of the Sidonians, and Milcom the abomination of the Ammonites.

So Solomon did what was evil in the sight of the Lord, and did not completely follow the Lord, as his father David had done.

Yet I feel like we are so far apart spiritually when we are so close in every other way. A century or two ago, most people lived in places where almost everyone around them was the same religion. w=580" class="size-full wp-image-7945" src="https://leewoof.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/interfaith-wedding-ceremony.jpg? w=605" alt="An interfaith wedding ceremony - Christian / Jewish" srcset="https://leewoof.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/580w, https://leewoof.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/interfaith-wedding-ceremony.jpg? Only you are in your shoes, and only you can decide whether or how to continue in a relationship in which the two of you do not share the same religious beliefs. First, let’s look at traditional religious strictures against marrying people of other religions.

For example: When the Lord your God brings you into the land that you are about to enter and occupy, and he clears away many nations before you . (Deuteronomy 7:1, 3–4King Solomon loved many foreign women along with the daughter of Pharaoh: Moabite, Ammonite, Edomite, Sidonian, and Hittite women, from the nations concerning which the Lord had said to the Israelites, “You shall not enter into marriage with them, neither shall they with you; for they will surely incline your heart to follow their gods”; Solomon clung to these in love.

This creates challenges that only a few of our great-grandparents had to face. These prohibitions are usually based on two dangers: To deal with the second danger, religions that do allow their members to marry people of other faiths often require that the children be brought up in their own members’ faith.

Dealing with the first danger is even more complicated.

I’m willing to go to church but he needs to be understanding that I may not have the same outlook on it.

I come from a Muslim background but wasn’t raised so.

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